Posts Tagged ‘moca museum

22
Feb
19

Are we dancing with a Madman? “Immortal” panting by artist Eriberto Oriol


“Immortal” is one of the social commentary paintings in the series “Dancing with a Madman” by artist Eriberto Oriol.

They say that every picture has a story; this is definitely true for Eriberto’s work. For him, mythology has become a way to help make sense of his world. Breasts and penises are common themes in mythology and also in Eriberto’s artwork, but he does not use them as phallic symbols. In this painting, he is using the penises as symbols of power. In a society where many seek to immortalize themselves through physical monuments, it is perhaps why some skyscrapers broadly resemble and represent the penis, so do rockets, bullets, missiles, and memorialized monuments.

For artists, the journey to find oneself and to be true to their art is often a lonely one. It is a journey that at times is not by choice, however, it is sometimes necessary for an artist. Eriberto often finds that his characters, although not always obvious, often seem to reflect haunting moments of human life that resonate with the fears and emotions most people experience. Georgia O’Keeffe once said, “To create one’s own world in any of the arts takes courage.”

It has been said that art is not what you see but what it makes you see. An artist’s journey can be bewildering; they do not often know its origin or meaning. However, as in this painting, when artists use their imagination as a source of genius, it deepens the mystery and the magic in art.

Eriberto knows that to become truly immortal, one must face their basic fears, imagine the unimaginable and in that way, they will live forever through believing in their own genius and in the magic of imagination.

Text by Angelica Oriol

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12
Feb
19

Are we dancing with a Madman?


 

This is a series of paintings with social commentaries that speak of the rage of power, the screams of the victim and invisible erased souls begging not to be forgotten.

“The Rage of Power” is one of the social commentaries paintings in the series “Dancing with a Madman” by artist Eriberto Oriol.

Through his paintings, Eriberto is helping us see what others at times do not see. He allows the creativity of his imagination to be seen in his work. Historically that is what artists have done.

Artists such as Francisco Goya’s etchings “Los Caprichos” and Pablo Picasso’s with “Guernica” documented some of the cruel and inhuman events of the war, greed, and power. Some felt that these bizarre paintings were a sign of madness, completely off the wall because they were different from everyone else’s. I would argue that these artists were really in tune with the creative force of the universe.

SAVE THIS DATE: June 14, 2019

Photos and text by Angelica Oriol

12
Feb
19

Are we dancing with a Madman?


This is a series of paintings with social commentaries that speak of the rage of power, screams of victims and invisible erased souls begging not to be forgotten.

“The Rage of Power” is one of the social commentaries paintings in the series “Dancing with a Madman” by artist Eriberto Oriol. more text below

 

Rage of Power by Eriberto Oriol

 

When I first saw this painting it made me think of the main character’s rage and how women have been more vulnerable in war, politics, and power just because they have a pussy, at least this is my interpretation.

Of course, this is not what this artist set out to paint; his images come from his creative zone that he allows to take charge and he just paints. In this powerful painting, the image speaks of the rage of power with an abrasive grab that symbolizes dominance and violence.

He uses the color pink to tease the viewer into arousal and maybe to emphasize the power that these images represent. Eriberto knows that since the beginning of time, people with power and money have had a significant impact on society when they have allowed their greed and insecurity to get the best of them.

Through his paintings, Eriberto is helping us see what others at times do not see. He allows the creativity of his imagination to be seen in his work. Historically that is what artists have done.

Artists such as Francisco Goya’s etchings “Los Caprichos” and Pablo Picasso’s with “Guernica” documented some of the cruel and inhuman events of the war, greed, and power. Some felt that these bizarre paintings were a sign of madness, completely off the wall because they were different from everyone else’s. I would argue that these artists were really in tune with the creative force of the universe.

SAVE THIS DATE: June 14, 2019

Text by Angelica Oriol

21
Jun
18

Did you kill the song?


When you kill the bird, you kill the song. As it would be, when you kill the person’s spirit you kill the soul and their song.
In this painting, “The Ravages of Greed and Power,” the artist
Eriberto Oriol seems to capture the characters’ pain and anguish of their dying souls.

Did you kill the Song?

He hopes that these powerful characters startle people out of their daily routine and question the sanity of greed and power.
Most of the time Eriberto does not want these faces to come in his paintings. He prefers that he could just paint without the psychological trips.
Why do artists do this? El Greco felt that the spirits whispered madly in his ears. For artists like Francis Bacon and Edvard Munch, some felt that their disturbing paintings were a sign of madness and that these artists were completely off the wall.
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Eriberto feels it is a privilege to have the unique distinction of being an artist that allows him to see the world that is not always obvious.
His dream is that the sky would get bluer, that the birds would start to sing again, and the glaciers stop melting.
In Spanish we say, “El Sueno del artista, es que el cielo se vuelva mas azul, los pajaros comienzen a cantar de nuevo, y los glaciares dejen de derretirese.
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Text by Angelica
Painting by Eriberto Oriol
Go to our Blog: ForbiddenArtLA.com to see artwork available.
30
May
18

What does it mean to be a Genius?


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To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men, — that is genius. Ralph Waldo Emerson

In today’s society full of noisy distractions, how does one find their true genius?   What prevents a person from embracing the wisdom of ancient great civilizations?

 

In this painting “Civilizations” the artist Eriberto Oriol seems to be embracing and celebrating the symbols of ancient civilizations that have influenced him and his art.

"Civilizations"

“Civilizations”

He seems to be projecting his influences through shape, form, color, bold lines and texture.

 

His work bares influences of his father’s appreciation for the natural environment, Mesoamerica roots, love for African art and the Japanese influence that came from working as a young man with gardeners and landscapers.

 

It’s hard for Eriberto to try to give meaning or interpretation to his work, as he just seems to be a vessel for these inspirations. He believes that art retains a primal spirit, which allows him to go beyond himself.

 

He hopes that his work will help others to detect their own gleam of light? Imagine the Un-imaginable and to encourage them to see the contributions and achievements of other great civilizations.

 

Close-up of "Civilizations"

Close-up of “Civilizations”

 

Close-up of "Civilizations"

Close-up of “Civilizations”

 

Text by Angelica

Painting by Eriberto Oriol

Go to our Blog: ForbiddenArtLA.com to see artwork available.

 

 

 

03
May
18

Are you an artist without style?


Picasso once said: “When I think about it, I’d say I’m an artist without style. Style puts constraints on the artist …” Picasso had many different styles, i.e. he had his Blue Period, African Period, Cubism and others.

 

Eriberto also has several styles in his art and he does not limit his creativity to his art.

If you have been a guest in Eriberto Oriol’s studio, you would know that for him; a taco is not just a taco.

It’s like he sometimes says, “Life is about meditating with your eyes open and allowing the imagination to take you where it may. Eriberto allows his creative mind to reflect on his paintings, drawings, photos, cooking and his life.

In this photo, the artist Eriberto Oriol is holding his painting “Hung-over” and his sculpture “La Familia/The Family” is next to him on the wall.

Some say, “Where there is light, there is a dream.” For an artist, sustainability through their art is the Dream.

Text by Angelica
Paintings by Eriberto Oriol

GO TO: ForbiddenArtLA.com see Store to see available Prints and also Graffiti Prints

Image may contain: one or more people

 

24
Apr
18

Where are you going?


SAME PLACE.

What are you doing? SAME THING.

What are you eating? SAME THING.

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In a world with so much SAMENESS, artist Eriberto Oriol does NOT want to create the same thing over and over. He feels is not natural for life to do and be the SAME THING over and over every day. He does not want to live his life that way.

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In this Caras/Faces series, Eriberto is more playful but still, as he sometimes says, meditating with his eyes open. He allows his imagination to take him where it may. It is hard for Eriberto to find meaning in his work. He just seems to follow his inspiration.

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Eriberto has several styles in his art. He paints, he draws, he takes photos, he cooks and he lives. Even in his walks, he is always looking for a different route, a different place to explore.

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As a mature artist, many masters in the art have influenced him. He loves spending time and time again reviewing great artworks from Africa, Asia, Mesoamerica, and others. He is in awe of their creativity and imagination.

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Some say, “Where there is light, there is a dream.” For an artist, sustainability through their art is the Dream.

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Painting by Eriberto Oriol

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Text by Angelica

GO TO: ForbiddenArtLA.com for available prints




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