Posts Tagged ‘art drawings

18
Jun
19

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06
Jun
19

Julie Rico Art Review on artist Eriberto Oriol


Eriberto is a Los Angeles based painter he creates work with a Latin world ethos. A confluence of European and Indigenous Indian cultures.

The term “Cosmic Race”, is brought to mind in this work, coined by Jose Vasconcelos a Mexican philosopher. Vasconcelos believed that nationality and race is transcended by Latin Americans with their Asian-descended native Americans, European and African heritage. You can see in Oriol’s work the same kind of merging of cultures.

 

Dante's Inferno painting by Eriberto Oriol

Dante’s Inferno painting by Eriberto Oriol

 

Oriol provides us a reflection of the indigenous dream like state. The dreams that brought wisdom and guidance to the tribe were achieved with the ceremonial use of alkaloids such as Peyote or Ayahuasca. The skillful interpretation that Mr. Oriol achieves in his work reflects the forces of the universe as it affects our collective journey into the unconscious. At the same time the colors the painting techniques emphasize European influences.

The work is not easy. Like Picasso’s Guernica that shows the tragedy of war. The internal struggle is what is emphasized in Mr. Oriol’s work. We feel the power we have within ourselves with this work.

Many of the works are clearly phallic. Just prior to the sexual revolution in the 60’s and 70’s American art was overly affected by Christian values of the Puritans. The phallus was usually hidden not exposed as in Mr. Oriol’s paintings. The sexual revolution allowed the phallus to show up in sculptures and other contemporary art. Look at work by Louise Bourgeois and Andy Warhol. Surely, this affected Mr. Oriol a product of that time.

But let’s go back even further to pre-Columbian times where we see references to the phallus as an important cultural icon to the indigenous populations all over the world. The influences of pre-Columbian art cannot be denied in this work. The paintings are not always pleasant. They are; however, wondrous and terrifying and beautiful portraying dream likes states of mind.

As was the intention of the Indigenous their dreams were meant to help the community at large. It is the same with Mr. Oriol’s work. He may want us to see the hidden power of our animal nature. As witnesses to our hidden power in the paintings, will we be overcome the angst, the sometimes powerlessness we feel in our daily lives. The power of the phallus is in our DNA, we cannot separate ourselves from our animal nature. Contemplation is key to our understanding of our place here in the world. Mr. Oriol’s paintings help us see an inner world.

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Julie Rico is an artmuse and has had her own galleries representing many artists including:  Jean Jacques Bastarache, Salomon Huerta, Treiops, Ed Big Daddy Roth, Stanley Mouse, Bill Plympton, Lama Lhanang, Mark Bryan, Dennis Larkins, Craig Stecyk, Robert Williams, Patssi Valdez, Diane Gamboa, Timothy Leary, Michael McMillan, Kai Bob Cheng, Ray Zone, Von Dutch, Einar and Jamex de la Torre, Brian Tortora and about 100 or more artists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

23
Apr
19

“Small DIC tator” Text by Angelica Oriol


“The “Small DIC tator ”

This is one of the paintings in “Are We Dancing with A Madman?” series by artist Eriberto Oriol.

The “Small DIC tator ” painting reminds me of how throughout history we have seen insecurities, fears and the insatiable greed dictate violence and hate on people who possessed the wealth that the Empire wanted. Resources such as the land, its’ people, oil, minerals, diamonds, and water have often been a threat to the peace and sovereignty of that country.

“Small DIC tator” Text by Angelica Oriol

Eriberto does not try to paint work that deals with social issues and does not care to find meaning in his work. However, it is through our conversations that my writings emerge. It makes me wonder if in a “redactive” world, would there be room for artists such as Alfredo Siqueiros with his mural “America Tropical,” Goya’s “Los Caprichos,” or for other artists that encourage a public dialogue of our collective consciousness?

As artists, we often see what others do not see.  For some, our journey is a quest for a moral life and social change. The dream is to be able to tell the TRUTH, use our creativity and imaginations to take us beyond the basic purpose of art; forge a new pathway for a world that would be about human kindness, caring, sharing and to create a world that never was.

Save these DATES: June 14 and June 28, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

04
Apr
19

“They’re There for The Taking” painting by Eriberto Oriol


“They’re There for The Taking” is one of the social commentaries paintings in “Are We Dancing with A Madman?” series by artist Eriberto Oriol.
While women have much to contribute, for the most part, global societies have assigned restrictive roles that limit their potential. In this metaphorical painting, the artist is being brutally honest in questioning the predator/prey type relationship.
The furry body emphasizes how women are viewed as an animal and are subject to the hunt whether they like it or not.
The insect-like image symbolizes the pest that means to destroy or harm. Is this a hopelessness human behavior of a patriarchal world? Can we get over the repugnance correlation of women like animals in the food chain?
Artist Edgar Degas once said, “Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.” If this painting facilitates a discussion that acknowledges this behavior, maybe we can empower ourselves and make plans to stand differently in this world.
Save these DATES:
June 14 and June 28, 2019
14
Mar
19

Nocturnal paintings in the series “Dancing with a Madman” by artist Eriberto Oriol


Nocturnal is a beautifully textured background painting with the color blue being more dominant. The main character not only has four breasts but it also has two penises. What could this artist have been thinking? Eriberto does not try to find meaning in his work; he just gets in his creative zone and allows his characters to emerge.

In his paintings, he seems to be embracing the symbols of ancient civilizations and mythology that have influenced him and his art. Even though breasts and penises seemed to have been a taboo in our society, these symbols are sacred icons of mythology and of goddesses in other cultures, for instance, Japan has a Penis Festival and in Bhutan penises are worship. Click on links for information on the festival in Japan and Bhutan.

Some cultures have made the goddess of women who had more than two breasts. The Hatuibwari dragon of Melanesia had four pendulous breasts, which serve to feed and to nourish all the living. The goddess Meenakshi at the Temple Madurai had three breasts; she symbolized courage and power that challenged sexist notions of the world. The people of India believe she was bold, brave and considered herself equal to men.

 

In this painting, you will see that Eriberto is also using penises not as phallic symbols, but as symbols of power. He believes that the three Calaveras speak more about the violence and death of people caused by the abuse of power. It speaks of human truths, fears, and nightmares of seemly invisible erased souls begging not to be forgotten. He hopes that these powerful characters startle people out of their daily routine and question the sanity of greed and power and appreciate the art of artists in tune with the creative force of the universe.

Text and photo by Angelica Oriol

28
Feb
19

Are we dancing with a Madman? – Perros painting by artist Eriberto Oriol


“Perros” is one of the social commentary paintings in the series “Dancing with a Madman” by artist Eriberto Oriol.

In this painting, “Perros” Eriberto is not talking about the furry animals some call best friends nor would he insult these creatures to have the character traits that these dogs symbolized in this painting.

Puppies, chicks, and babies in general, are not born knowing how to hate or how to be violent. They are not just operating out of instinct, they are taught to be violent. However, these animals have been used as vicious weapons for mass destruction and brutal cruelty throughout history around the world. “The Dogs of the Conquest” by John Grier Varner and Jeannette Johnson Varner is just one of the stories of the horrific acts of cruelty and violence committed on those who had the resources the empire wanted.

The human-like faces in this painting seem to be communicating haunting moments of human life with a sort of an apocalyptic flare that is defiant and yet provoking.

In this painting, the spots just like in the cheetah distract their prey and camouflage them so they can blend or hide; the spots on the dogs in this image seem to represent the mask of camouflage of individuals who try to conceal their dominance and violence over their prey.

I think when artists discuss these dark moments it is because they see a giant alarm screaming what is blatantly oblivious. However, for some, this violence is invisible. All around the world, brutal violence is occurring because the empire wants the indigenous people’s resources and their land. Maybe this is the viciousness that the “Perros” painting is trying to communicate.

Humanity has been bestowed with the greatest gift of all time, imagination, for it has the power to change the world. For Eriberto, the dream is that the skies would get bluer, birds would start to sing again, and the glaciers would stop melting. In Spanish we say, “El Sueno del artista, es que el cielo se vuelva mas azul, los pajaros comienzen a cantar de nuevo, y los glaciares dejen de derretirese.

Text by Angelica Oriol

15
Feb
19

Are we dancing with a Madman?


This is a series of paintings with social commentaries that speak of the rage of power, the screams of the victim and invisible erased souls begging not to be forgotten. “The Rage of Power” is one of the social commentaries paintings in the series “Dancing with a Madman” by artist Eriberto Oriol.
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When I first saw this painting it made me think of the main character’s rage and how women have been more vulnerable in war, politics, and power just because they have a pussy, at least this is my interpretation.


Of course, this is not what this artist set out to paint; his images come from his creative zone that he allows to take charge and he just paints. In this powerful painting, the image speaks of the rage of power with an abrasive grab that symbolizes dominance and violence.
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He uses the color pink to tease the viewer into arousal and maybe to emphasize the power that these images represent. Eriberto knows that since the beginning of time, people with power and money have had a significant impact on society when they have allowed their greed and insecurity to get the best of them.
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Through his paintings, Eriberto is helping us see what others at times do not see. He allows the creativity of his imagination to be seen in his work. Historically that is what artists have done.
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Artists such as Francisco Goya’s etchings “Los Caprichos” and Pablo Picasso’s with “Guernica” documented some of the cruel and inhuman events of the war, greed, and power. Some felt that these bizarre paintings were a sign of madness, completely off the wall because they were different from everyone else’s. I would argue that these artists were really in tune with the creative force of the universe.
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SAVE THIS DATE: June 14, 2019
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Photos and text by Angelica Oriol




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